Impact of Microstructure on the Containment and Migration of CO2 in Fractured Basalts Email Page
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Performer: Washington University
Three different possible carbonation scenarios within<br/>fractures in basalts. The carbonation is the result of<br/>chemical precipitation results from interactions between<br/>the minerals in the basalt and injected carbon dioxide.<br/>Each scenario will affect the carbonation by either impeding or accelerating storage.
Three different possible carbonation scenarios within
fractures in basalts. The carbonation is the result of
chemical precipitation results from interactions between
the minerals in the basalt and injected carbon dioxide.
Each scenario will affect the carbonation by either impeding or accelerating storage.
Website: The Washington University
Award Number: FE0023382
Project Duration: 10/01/2014 – 03/31/2018
Total Award Value: $1,284,701
DOE Share: $996,951
Performer Share: $287,750
Technology Area: Geologic Storage
Key Technology:
Location: St. Louis, Missouri

Project Description

Under this project, Washington University will advance the understanding of microstructure and surface chemistry impacts on the flow and mineralization of carbon dioxide (CO2) injected into fractured basalt. The project will integrate geomechanical and geochemical characterization of rock cores to advance the understanding of in-situ characterization of the evolution of fracture structure and carbon trapping mechanisms in basalt.

Project Benefits

The project will advance the understanding of fractured basalt reservoirs and the impact basalt structures and chemistry has on flow and mineral trapping of injected CO2. Understanding this is important to the Carbon Storage Program goals of improving reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness and contributing to the ability to predict CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. Specifically, the project is performing laboratory experiments on rock cores and integrating geomechanical and geochemical data from those experiments to understand fracture structures and changes of carbon-trapping mechanisms in basalts over time.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Andrea McNemar: andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Daniel Giammar: degiammar@seas.wustl.edu

 

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