Back to Top
Skip to main content

Twitter Icon Linkedin Icon Facebook Icon Instagram Icon You Tube Icon Flickr Icon

Turbines are essential in meeting America’s power demands, producing electricity at virtually every power plant in the United States.
Turbines are essential in meeting America’s power demands, producing electricity at virtually every power plant in the United States. With fossil fuels projected to remain the dominant source of energy for decades to come, advanced combustion turbine technology will play a critical role in capitalizing on the nation’s vast domestic resources. While many energy technologies are focused on one specific application, advanced combustion turbines offer versatility in their ability to be adapted for use in a variety of power systems – including those fueled by coal or natural gas, combined with pre- or post-combustion carbon capture. NETL’s work to improve advanced combustion turbines seeks to boost overall turbine efficiency, cut the cost of electricity, reduce pollutant emissions and enable more affordable carbon capture options.
NETL Acting Director Sean I. Plasynski, Ph.D., and Ramaco Carbon Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Randall Atkins signed an umbrella cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) on Thursday, June 7, at the Lab’s Pittsburgh site.
The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is launching a valuable partnership with Ramaco Carbon to collaborate on innovative projects that use coal to manufacture high-value products. NETL Acting Director Sean I. Plasynski, Ph.D., and Ramaco Carbon Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Randall Atkins signed an umbrella cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) on Thursday, June 7, at the Lab’s Pittsburgh site. The agreement allows NETL and Ramaco Carbon to work together on specific projects that use coal as a manufacturing feedstock for high-value products. The CRADA will enhance NETL’s materials engineering and manufacturing capabilities by allowing Lab researchers access to coal-based manufacturing and 3D-printing facilities being developed by Ramaco Carbon near Sheridan, Wyoming. Once construction is completed, Ramaco Carbon will operate the world’s only fully integrated carbon resource-based research, development and production facility.
student researchers who are participating in the Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) and Consortium for Integrating Energy Systems in Engineering and Science Education (CIESESE) programs
NETL opened its doors – and its labs – June 4 to student researchers who are participating in the Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) and Consortium for Integrating Energy Systems in Engineering and Science Education (CIESESE) programs. Participants include more than 40 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors who will get hands-on experience in NETL’s cutting-edge research facilities and work one-on-one with the Lab’s world-class scientists and engineers. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, MLEF kicks off its 23rd year with a class of undergraduate and graduate students. The program was named after late Congressman Mickey Leland of Texas, a passionate advocate on many issues who died in a 1989 plane crash while on a mission to Ethiopia. 
FOA Logo
The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has announced an extension of the submission period for the Request for Information (RFI) for input on the development of small-scale, modular coal-based power plants of the future. The new deadline for RFI submissions is July 9, 2018.    The objective of this RFI is to support DOE’s mission to lead research and technology development that promotes the advancement of coal-fired power plants that provide stable power generation with operational flexibility, high efficiency, and low emissions.  To review the RFI, please click here. Responses to this RFI must be submitted electronically to DE-FOA-0001931@netl.doe.gov with the subject line "DE-FOA-0001931 – RFI" no later than 8:00 p.m. (ET) on July 9, 2018.
The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced that 15 of its employees were honored with prestigious awards by the Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board
The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced that 15 of its employees were honored with prestigious awards by the Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board (FEB) for significant accomplishments, leadership, outreach, and impact on the region and beyond. The FEB held the 2018 annual Excellence in Government Awards Program luncheon at the Westin Convention Center in Pittsburgh. The awards program recognizes outstanding federal employees for efforts that encourage innovation and excellence in government, reinforce pride in federal service; and help call public attention to the broad range of services provided by federal employees. The awards were selected by an independent committee of federal executives. In total, NETL employees took home two Gold Awards, three Silver Awards, and two Bronze Awards. The recognized individuals and teams and their award categories are:
UAF Alaska National Lab Day University of Alaska Fairbanks
The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is hosting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, including NETL, for a workshop on May 30 and 31. The workshop creates links and explores opportunities for partnerships between the DOE national laboratories and the University of Alaska. Organizers hope the workshop leverages America’s national laboratories to advance Alaska’s, and the nation’s, goals for growing the economy, developing and implementing sustainable energy solutions, and understanding the implications of a changing Arctic environment.
Funding Opportunity Announcement
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy has announced an award for a project to receive approximately $7 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development in unconventional oil and natural gas (UOG) recovery. The project, selected under the Office of Fossil Energy’s (FE) Advanced Technology Solutions for Unconventional Oil and Gas Development funding opportunity, will address critical gaps in our understanding of reservoir behavior and optimal well-completion strategies, next-generation subsurface diagnostic technologies, and advanced offshore technologies. As part of the funding opportunity announcement, DOE solicited research field projects in UOG plays in a variety of environments and geological formations to better understand the subsurface and improve oil and gas recovery efficiency. Research focuses on addressing challenges of flow conformance and sweep efficiency, and the geophysical and geochemical mechanisms governing enhanced gas and oil recovery, in a variety of environments. 
Funding Opportunity Announcement
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected three projects to receive approximately $29.6 million for cost-shared research and development under Phase II of funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001450, Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE): Storage Complex Feasibility.  Projects chosen under this FOA will determine the feasibility for commercial-scale storage complexes that can hold 50+ million metric tons of carbon.
Institute for the Design of Advanced Energy Systems (IDAES)
Representatives from more than 15 energy-related companies from around the nation will learn about cutting-edge computational tools and approaches to help design and scale up new high-efficiency power plants, support existing plants, and improve resiliency at a workshop May 23 and 24 in Washington, DC sponsored by the Institute for Design of Advanced Energy Systems (IDAES) – a collaborative effort involving NETL, sister National Laboratories and key academic research institutions. IDAES consists of experts from NETL, Sandia and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Carnegie Mellon University and West Virginia University. Pooling skills and resources, the Institute is pioneering development of new computational tools that can be used to optimize the performance of power plants over a full range of operating conditions – both supporting the existing fleet and enabling the design and scale up of transformative advanced coal energy systems.
Kyle Rozman works with a crack sample in NETL’s load frame.
Because supercritical CO2 (sCO2) power cycles can improve thermal efficiency and enable energy production from domestic fossil fuels with responsible stewardship of the environment, NETL researchers are aggressively investigating how to maximize the service life of materials in sCO2environments. sCO2 power cycles operate similarly to other turbine cycles, but they use CO2 – rather than steam – as the working fluid in the turbomachinery.  In its supercritical state, CO2 remains liquid-like rather than gas-like and has unique properties for energy generation equipment. For example, turbomachinery that uses sCO2 can be very compact and highly efficient, requiring less compression and enabling better heat exchange. sCO2 power cycles operate at very high pressures, which means they operate more efficiently so more energy can be created from less fuel and with a reduced cost. Because sCO2power cycles require higher pressures than traditional power generation systems, the physics, chemistry, and components do not behave as they would in conventional systems.