Improving NOx Entitlement with Axial Staging

 

A high speed and high temperature combustion chamber will be used to develop reacting Jet-in-Crossflow correlation and validate existing CFD capabilities.
A high speed and high temperature combustion chamber will be used to develop reacting Jet-in-Crossflow correlation and validate existing CFD capabilities.
Performer: 
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Website:  Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Award Number:  FE0031227
Project Duration:  10/01/2017 – 09/30/2020
Total Award Value:  $803,234
DOE Share:  $599,988
Performer Share:  $203,246
Technology Area:  Advanced Turbines
Key Technology:  Advanced Combustion Turbines
Location:  Daytona, Florida

Project Description

Research into axial staging has become increasingly important to enable power plant efficiency increase without increasing NOx emissions. Engine manufacturers have performed full-scale testing of axially staged combustor designs, but the costs and complexities limit the design space that can be evaluated through testing. The known small-scale tests to date have been performed at atmospheric conditions and not necessarily with geometry and operating conditions appropriate to real engines. Axial staging is an important topic that engine manufacturers need to understand better to meet future efficiency and emission requirements. This project will characterize flame extinction dynamics for fuel flexible low-emission combustion. The data obtained from this project will be correlated into a reacting jet in crossflow model to help in the design of engines. An improved understanding and prediction of flame extinction and dynamic flame stability will guide strategies to improve efficiency, reduce emissions, and improve performance of power generation combustion systems.

Project Benefits

Anticipated benefits from projects funded through the University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program include development of technologies that will accelerate turbine performance, efficiency, and emissions reduction beyond the current-state-of-the-art and reduce the risk to market for novel and advanced turbine-based power generation. In addition, the UTSR Program seeks to maintain and enhance U.S. university-based turbine science capabilities to ensure a world-class scientific workforce for future generations. UTSR is a component of NETL’s Advanced Turbines Program that manages a portfolio of projects designed to remove environmental concerns over the future use of fossil fuels by developing revolutionary, near-zero-emission advanced turbines technologies.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Seth Lawson: seth.lawson@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Richard Dennis: richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Scott Martin: martis38@erau.edu
 

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