Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration and Trapping in Fractured Reservoirs with Validation by Model Comparison and Real-Site Applications Email Page
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Performer: Trustees of Princeton University
Image of an outcrop (top) with layering and<br/>fractures identified. Understanding the fracture<br/>network is an important function in developing the<br/>discrete fracture model (bottom) that is the initial<br/>step in the development of the projects multiscale model.
Image of an outcrop (top) with layering and
fractures identified. Understanding the fracture
network is an important function in developing the
discrete fracture model (bottom) that is the initial
step in the development of the projects multiscale model.
Website: Trustees of Princeton University
Award Number: FE0023323
Project Duration: 10/01/2014 – 09/30/2018
Total Award Value: $800,000
DOE Share: $600,000
Performer Share: $200,000
Technology Area: Geologic Storage
Key Technology:
Location: Princeton, New Jersey

Project Description

Princeton University is developing new modeling capabilities for simulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and brine migration in fractured reservoirs by developing more accurate descriptions of flow interactions between fractures and the rock matrix. The new model will be incorporated into a reservoir-scale simulator and sensitivity analyses will be performed on the trapping efficiency and storage capacity using the new model. Ultimately, the new model will be applied to the In Salah CO2 storage site in Algeria to simulate CO2 injection and fracture matrix interaction using historical injection data.

Project Benefits

The project is developing new capabilities for carbon storage modeling in fractured reservoirs through improvements in the representation of fracture-matrix flow interactions. This improved representation will increase the accuracy of CO2 and brine migration modeling in fractured reservoirs, allowing for better predictions of the CO2 distribution within the storage reservoir. This effort is contributing to the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing technologies that support the ability to predict CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. Specifically, the project is developing a new fracture and flow interaction model and incorporating the model into a reservoir scale simulator. A sensitivity analysis of trapping efficiency and storage capacity will then be performed and the new model will be applied to real world conditions at the In Salah CO2 injection site in Algeria.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager David Cercone: david.cercone@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Michael Celia: celia@princeton.edu

 

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