A Coupled Geomechanical, Acoustic, Transport, and Sorption Study of Caprock Integrity in Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sequestration Email Page
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Performer:  Colorado School of Mines Location:  Golden, Colorado
Project Duration:  10/01/2014 – 09/30/2018 Award Number:  FE0023223
Technology Area:  Geologic Storage Total Award Value:  $1,486,280
Key Technology:  GS: Geomechanical Impacts DOE Share:  $1,036,280
Performer Share:  $450,000

Diagram of triaxial coreflood test system.<br/>The system allows for caprock samples to be<br/>analyzed under simulated real world pressures<br/>and temperatures. The system has integrated x-ray<br/>tomography and acoustics to allow for direct<br/>measurement of the conditions of mechanical failure<br/>and permeability of damage to shale resulting from<br/>brine and CO<sub>2</sub> injection.
Diagram of triaxial coreflood test system.
The system allows for caprock samples to be
analyzed under simulated real world pressures
and temperatures. The system has integrated x-ray
tomography and acoustics to allow for direct
measurement of the conditions of mechanical failure
and permeability of damage to shale resulting from
brine and CO2 injection.

Project Description

This project is working to develop a further understanding of how shales respond to carbon dioxide (CO2)-induced deformation and reactions. Research is being conducted to quantify CO2 transmissivity and the development of acoustic methods for detecting damaged to CO2-saturated caprock through in-situ experimental studies of shale. This project will provide tools to identify damaged shale caprock and a means of determining if CO2 has migrated through the caprock.

Project Benefits

The project will provide insight to how shales respond to CO2-induced deformation and fracturing. Additionally, it is assessing the risk of CO2 leakage arising from geomechanical forces that damage shale and will develop tools with which to monitor and identify regions in which shale has been damaged. Specifically, the project is performing laboratory experiments on shale rock cores to study their geophysical and geochemical responses to CO2 injection. It will study the ability of seismic technology to understand and detect caprock damage and integrate the findings to develop protocols for shale characterization and develop guidelines for assessing sealing capacity of damaged caprock.

Presentations, Papers, and Publications

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Stephen Henry: stephen.henry@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Manika Prasad: mprasad@mines.edu