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Analysis Focus: Coal Combustion Power Plants

Effects of Cold Temperature and Main Compressor Intercooling on Recuperator and Recompression Cycle Performance - Presentation

Date: 8/31/2018
Contact: Nathan Weiland

This study investigates the effects of cold supercritical CO2 (sCO2) temperatures, compressor inlet pressures, and main compressor intercooling on the efficiency and specific power of recompression sCO2 cycles. Reducing the cold sCO2 temperature increases the compressor inlet density, thus reducing required compression power and increasing cycle thermal efficiency. Similarly, main compressor intercooling improves the specific power of a recompression cycle, reducing sCO2 mass flow, cycle size and cost for a given power output, though it is also shown to lead to an internal pinch point in the low temperature recuperator. Strategies for remediation of internal pinch points for recuperators as well as for the main CO2 cooler and the flue gas cooler are discussed, and apply to recompression cycles for all sCO2 applications. Upfront consideration of these remediation strategies is essential to determine attainable sCO2 cycle operating conditions and component sizing requirements.


Effects of Cold Temperature and Main Compressor Intercooling on Recuperator and Recompression Cycle Performance

Date: 8/30/2018
Contact: Nathan Weiland

This study investigates the effects of cold supercritical CO2 (sCO2) temperatures, compressor inlet pressures, and main compressor intercooling on the efficiency and specific power of recompression sCO2 cycles. Reducing the cold sCO2 temperature increases the compressor inlet density, thus reducing required compression power and increasing cycle thermal efficiency. Similarly, main compressor intercooling improves the specific power of a recompression cycle, reducing sCO2 mass flow, cycle size and cost for a given power output, though it is also shown to lead to an internal pinch point in the low temperature recuperator. Strategies for remediation of internal pinch points for recuperators as well as for the main CO2 cooler and the flue gas cooler are discussed, and apply to recompression cycles for all sCO2 applications. Upfront consideration of these remediation strategies is essential to determine attainable sCO2 cycle operating conditions and component sizing requirements.


Plant Efficiency Evaluation at Navajo Generating Station

Date: 1/18/2018
Contact: Jeff Hoffmann

Summary report of a high-level technical and engineering assessment of opportunities for improving the heat rate (i.e., efficiency) of the three existing coal-fueled electric generating units at the Navajo Generating Station located near Page, Arizona.


Techno-economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Power Plants Based on the Indirect sCO2 Brayton Cycle - Report

Date: 9/25/2017
Contact: Walter Shelton

This report presents the results of a techno-economic analysis (TEA) of a coal-fired utility scale power plant based on the indirect supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycle using an oxy-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB).  A baseline plant configuration was examined as well as three variations to the sCO2 power cycle examining the impact of reheat (Rht), main compressor intercooling (IC), and a combination of reheat and main compressor intercooling (RhtIC).  Each plant configuration was assessed at two turbine inlet temperatures of 620 °C and 760 °C.


Techno-economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Power Plants Based on the Indirect sCO2 Brayton Cycle - Presentation

Date: 6/19/2017
Contact: Walter Shelton

This presentation discusses the results of a techno-economic analysis (TEA) of a coal-fired utility scale power plant based on the indirect supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycle using an oxy-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB).  A baseline plant configuration was examined as well as three variations to the sCO2 power cycle examining the impact of reheat (Rht), main compressor intercooling (IC), and a combination of reheat and main compressor intercooling (RhtIC).  Each plant configuration was assessed at two turbine inlet temperatures of 620 °C and 760 °C.


Coal-Hybrid Power Systems for the Future

Date: 2/4/2016
Contact: Thomas Tarka

New coal-fired generation must be able to operate flexibly, at high efficiency, and be able to meet new performance standards for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. By creating an integrated energy complex that co-locates a state-of-the-art coal-fired power plant with renewable energy sources and (potentially) energy storage, coal generation can meet new emissions targets and provide high-capacity factor, reliable energy. Several scenarios are examined to determine optimal configurations and the impacts of integrating different renewable or natural gas power generation with a coal-fired power generation.


Design of a Commercial Scale Oxy-Coal Supercritical CO2 Power Cycle

Date: 10/7/2015
Contact: Nathan Weiland

This presentation provides an overview of NETL’s analyses of the supercritical CO2 (SCO2) recompression Brayton cycle for application to commercial scale power plants with CO2 capture. This cycle has the potential to achieve over 50% efficiency due to the recuperation of heat from the SCO2 turbine exhaust, while the high SCO2 density may yield reductions in plant footprint and capital cost. Prior work has found that a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) with enhanced combustion air preheating would be a suitable indirect heat source for a SCO2 power cycle. This work investigates several options for efficiently integrating an oxy-fired CFB with an indirect SCO2 cycle, including thermal integration with the air separation unit, and utilization of combustor exhaust heat to thermally balance the low temperature recuperator. The sensitivity of plant performance to various cycle parameters is investigated, and the effect of design choices on the plant’s capital cost is discussed.


Impact of Load Following on the Economics of Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Operations

Date: 6/3/2015
Contact: Eric Grol

This report evaluates the effects of increased cold starts on an existing 300 MW coal-fired unit operating and maintenance (O&M) and fuel costs resulting from reduced dispatchability in the market. Component level impacts on equipment are characterized and assessed to estimate changes in O&M costs resulting from 1, 6, and 12 cold starts per year. Report findings discuss the change in both O&M and fuel costs based on different number of cold starts and varying capacity factors. Results are presented in terms of impact to cost of electricity ($/MWh).


Cost and Performance of PC and IGCC Plants for a Range of Carbon Dioxide Capture - Rev 1

Date: 9/19/2013
Contact: Timothy Fout

The objective of this study was to establish the cost and performance for a range of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture levels for new supercritical (SC) pulverized coal (PC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants.


Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity, Revision 2a, September 2013

Date: 9/1/2013
Contact: Timothy Fout

Objective is to establish baseline performance and cost estimates for today’s fossil energy plants, it is necessary to look at the current state of technology. Such a baseline can be used to benchmark the progress of the Fossil Energy RD&D portfolio. This study provides an accurate, independent assessment of the cost and performance for Pulverized Coal (PC) Combustion, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC), and Natural Gas Combined Cycles (NGCC), all with and without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration assuming that the plants use technology available today.


Economic Feasibility of CO2 Capture Retrofits for the U.S. Coal Fleet: Impacts of R&D and CO2 EOR Revenue

Date: 6/26/2013
Contact: Gregory Hackett

In a 2nd generation CO2 capture market (2030) with no carbon regulations, compare business-as-usual to CO2 retrofits for enhanced oil recovery. Specifically, this presentation discusses the CCRD database design and operational details, discusses the improvements of 2nd generation capture technology, and how EOR revenue promotes more competitive dispatch.


Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology

Date: 1/31/2013
Contact: William Summers

The purpose of this section of the Quality Guidelines is to provide a standard basis for scaling costs, with specific emphasis on scaling exponents. The intention of having a standardized document is to provide guidelines for proper procedures to reduce the potential of errors and increase credibility through consistency. This document contains a listing of frequently used pieces of equipment and their corresponding scaling exponent for various plant types, along with their ranges of applicability. This document also details the equations to be used with each exponent.


Cost and Performance of PC and IGCC Plants for a Range of Carbon Dioxide Capture - Original

Date: 5/27/2011
Contact: Timothy Fout

The objective of this study was to establish the cost and performance for a range of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture levels for new supercritical (SC) pulverized coal (PC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants.