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Welcome to the Energy Analysis Search Publications page. Hundreds of Energy Analysis related publications can be found in this repository. To get started, begin filtering the results below by using the quick filters located on the Search Publications Landing Page or search within filtered results by using the search box below. 


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Life Cycle Analysis: Methodology

Grid Mix Explorer (Report)

Date: 1/28/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The goal of the Grid Mix Explorer is to allow the user to customize the makeup of their electricity grid specific to their life cycle case or desired scenario, and to generate a life cycle inventory for that particular mix of technologies.


Grid Mix Explorer (Model)

Date: 1/28/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The goal of the Grid Mix Explorer is to allow the user to customize the makeup of their electricity grid specific to their life cycle case or desired scenario, and to generate a life cycle inventory for that particular mix of technologies.


Indirect Impacts of Renewable Electricity Penetration and the Growing Importance of a Life Cycle Perspective

Date: 10/7/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

In this presentation, given at the LCA XIV Conference, it is observed that the percent of direct emissions to total emissions from the U.S. electricity mix decreases by 1.34%, and indirect emissions associated with wind, solar thermal, geothermal, and natural gas increase from 2010 to 2040. As such, the field of LCA becomes more important in the next 30 years in determining both the direct and indirect GHG emissions associated with comparative energy technologies, as well as other potential environmental impacts, where differences in indirect and direct emissions would be captured in framing economy wide policies.


Value of LCA and its Applicability to Natural Gas Analysis

Date: 6/18/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation discusses the value of an LCA perspective on natural gas with a focus on upstream natural gas. It also discusses the current natural gas research.


Estimating the GHG Footprint of Large-scale, Interconnected Energy Systems

Date: 5/20/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation discusses the benefits of LCA in regards to energy analysis. It compares technology options, evaluates policy impact on systems, considers coal and natural gas boundaries, and evaluates metrics.


Time series analysis of radiative forcing in a co-fired power system

Date: 5/20/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation considers the effect of GHG emission timing from of a power plant using different feedstocks -- coal, hybrid poplar, and roundwood. It also focuses on methods and aspects of the biomass systems, such as GWP metric, DLUC and ILUC, biomass uptake and emission, and modeling choice.


Using Life Cycle Analysis to Inform Energy Policy

Date: 12/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

NETL uses LCA to understand the environmental burdens of energy systems and to inform policy makers. LCA is well suited for energy analysis, but its answers can change depending on what questions are being asked. NETL approaches all LCAs using a consistent method, which ensures comparability among LCAs. The granularity and flexibility of NETL's models makes it possible to identify key contributors to the environmental burdens of a system, as well as the ability to understand how results can change with changes to a given input parameter. In addition to understanding the attributes of a given energy technology, NETL can also perform consequential modeling that allows an understanding of how a given energy technology can affect the performance of other energy technologies. The effect of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) on conventional crude oil extraction is one example of such consequential analysis.


Overview of Energy Life Cycle Analysis at NETL

Date: 10/2/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation describes the life cycle analysis (LCA) process at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). NETL uses LCA as a tool for evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of energy technology and policy options on a common basis. LCA includes the impacts of converting fuel to useful energy, infrastructure construction, extraction and transportation of fuel, and transport of the final energy product to the end user.


Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool Report

Date: 6/1/2013
Contact: Justin Adder

The Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) is a high-level dynamic model that calculates production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind (with and without backup power). All of the fossil fuel technologies also include the option of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. Power LCAT is targeted at helping policy makers, students, and interested stakeholders understand the economic and environmental tradeoffs associated with various electricity production options.


Power Generation Technology Comparison from a Life Cycle Perspective (Report)

Date: 6/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This analysis provides insight into key criteria for the feasibility of seven types of energy technologies. The seven types of technologies include electricity from natural gas, co-firing of coal and biomass, nuclear fuel, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and solar thermal resources. The key criteria for evaluating these technologies are defined.


Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Model)

Date: 6/1/2013
Contact: Justin Adder

The Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) is a high-level dynamic model that calculates production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind (with and without backup power). All of the fossil fuel technologies also include the option of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. Power LCAT is targeted at helping policy makers, students, and interested stakeholders understand the economic and environmental tradeoffs associated with various electricity production options.


Power Generation Technology Comparison from a Life Cycle Perspective (Presentation)

Date: 6/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This analysis provides insight into key criteria for the feasibility of seven types of energy technologies. The seven types of technologies include electricity from natural gas, co-firing of coal and biomass, nuclear fuel, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and solar thermal resources. The key criteria for evaluating these technologies are defined.


Power Generation Technology Comparison from a Life Cycle Perspective (Fact Sheet)

Date: 6/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This analysis provides insight into key criteria for the feasibility of seven types of energy technologies. The seven types of technologies include electricity from natural gas, co-firing of coal and biomass, nuclear fuel, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and solar thermal resources. The key criteria for evaluating these technologies are defined.


The Challenge of Co-product Management for Large-scale Energy Systems—Power, Fuel and CO2

Date: 10/2/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

Applying traditional co-product management methods such as physical allocation and system expansion in conventional ways can lead to large study uncertainty in LCA of large scale energy systems. The use of advanced power plants with carbon capture as a source of CO2 results in the co-production of electricity and transportation fuels (gasoline or diesel). Co-product allocation can be avoided by expanding the system to include displacement of other routes to electricity generation, but conjecture about the expanded system leads to wide uncertainty. If energy is used as a basis for co-product allocation between electricity and liquid fuel (diesel or gasoline), the differences between the useful energy in the energy products hinders comparability. Partitioning a portion of the system, in this case the power plant, to perform more accurate energy allocation is a third approach, and is possible when detailed plant schematics allow disaggregation of integrated processes.


LCA XII Presentation - Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Technology Assessment Compilation

Date: 10/1/2012
Contact: Robert James

NETL has applied a single set of methods for calculating the environmental, cost, and other aspects of seven options for baseload power generation. LCA is used to calculate environmental results, and life cycle boundaries are also applied to cost results. A set of other technical and non-technical criteria are used to gain a broad understanding of the roles of alternative energy sources in the U.S. energy portfolio.


LCA XII Presentation: From Unit Processes to Completed LCAs: NETL Life Cycle Analysis Library

Date: 10/1/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This poster describes what the DOE National Energy Technology (NETL) unit process library is, how the unit processes are used in NETL life cycle analyses, and how to access it.


Exploring Economics and Environmental Performance: Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) - LCA XII Presentation

Date: 10/1/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation poster discusses the Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT). The Power LCAT is a flexible model and associated tool which calculates electricity production costs and tracks life cycle environmental performance for a range of power generation technologies.


LCA XII Presentation: Overview of Energy Life Cycle Analysis at NETL

Date: 9/27/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation describes the life cycle analysis (LCA) process at NETL. NETL uses LCA as a tool and framework for evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of energy technology and policy options on a common basis. LCA includes the impacts of converting fuel to useful energy, infrastructure construction, extraction and transportation of fuel, and transport of the final energy product to the end user.


Exploring Economics and Environmental Performance: Power Systems LCA Tool

Date: 9/26/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The Power LCA Tool shows environmental and cost results for NETL's LCAs of power systems, including fossil and wind power. In addition to reporting results for costs and emissions, it allows trade-off analysis between costs and emissions. It also allows the user to evaluate the sensitivity of results to changes in key parameters..


Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) Technical Guide

Date: 5/1/2012
Contact: Justin Adder

Power LCAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies. This report summarizes key assumptions and results for version 2.0 of Power LCAT. This report has three goals: to explain the basic methodology used to calculate production costs and to estimate environmental performance; to provide a general overview of the model operation and initial results; and to demonstrate the wide range of options for conducting sensitivity analysis.


NETL Upstream Dashboard Tool

Date: 8/1/2011
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The goal of the Upstream Tool is to allow the user to customize key parameters specific to their Life Cycle case study or desired scenario, and generate customized Upstream Emissions results quickly and simply.