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Welcome to the Energy Analysis Search Publications page. Hundreds of Energy Analysis related publications can be found in this repository. To get started, begin filtering the results below by using the quick filters located on the Search Publications Landing Page or search within filtered results by using the search box below. 


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Life Cycle Analysis: Liquefied Natural Gas

Natural Gas and Power LCA Model Documentation (NG Report)

Date: 5/29/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

Natural gas is considered a cleaner burning and more flexible alternative to other fossil fuels today. It is used in residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in addition to having an expanding role in power production. However, the primary component of natural gas is methane, which is also a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG). Methane losses from natural gas extraction vary geographically and by extraction technology. This analysis inventories the GHG emissions from extraction, processing, and transmission of natural gas to large end users, and the combustion of that natural gas to produce electricity. In addition to GHG emissions, this analysis inventories other air emissions, water quality, water use, land use, and resource energy metrics.


LCA GHG Report (LNG Report)

Date: 5/29/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This analysis calculates the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from liquefied natural gas (LNG) exported from the U.S. and combusted by power plants in Europe or Asia and compares them to regional coal combusted by power plants in Europe and Asia. This analysis also calculates the GHG emissions from natural gas that is extracted in Russia and delivered by pipeline to European and Asian power plants. This analysis is based on data that were originally developed to represent U.S. energy systems: foreign natural gas and coal production were modeled as represented by U.S. natural gas production and average U.S. coal production. The results show that the use of U.S. LNG exports for power production in European and Asian markets will not increase GHG emissions, on a life cycle perspective, when compared to regional coal extraction and consumption for power production.