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Available Technologies

Title Sort descending Date Posted Patent Information Opportunity
A Cost-Effective Process for Making Graphene from Domestic Coal for use in Commercial Products U.S. Patent Pending

The invention is a new cost-effective way to make high-quality graphene from domestic coal feedstocks.  This graphene can be used to make a wide range of consumer products such as structural composites, water purification sorbents, stain- and water- resistant textiles, battery materials, and specialty pigments for paints and coatings.  Graphene is an outstanding material made from honeycomb sheets of carbon just one atom thick. Graphene is one of the lightest, strongest, and thinnest materials ever discovered. It has a high surface area, high thermal conductivity, strong chemical durability and high electron mobility making it ideal for use in products requiring mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and thermal/electrical conductivity. This inventive new process also co-produces rare earth elements (REEs) and distilled crude oil liquid, which have their own markets. The co-production of three high value products makes this invention an opportunity to maximize the profitability of a coal-based manufacturing process.

Challenge

Despite their amazing properties, carbon nanomaterials have not been widely commercialized primarily because of their high costs and limited supplies.  Currently, graphene costs approximately $20,000,000 per metric ton and global production capacity is less than 2000 tons/year. The high cost and low supply of graphene are major factors limiting its use in new and innovative consumer products.  These issues are driven, in part, by the expensive carbon feedstocks and complicated manufacturing processes currently used to make graphene.  The invention overcomes these challenges by utilizing inexpensive & plentiful domestic coal in a simple one-reactor process.  This approach brings the total manufacturing costs in line with other specialty materials, such as carbon fiber and carbon black, making the use of graphene in consumer products commercially viable.

A Unique Split Laser System for Environmental Monitoring USPN 7,421,166; USPN 8,786,840; USPN 8,934,511; USPN 9,297,696; USPN 9,548,585

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have developed a novel split laser system for in situ environmental monitoring via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) or Raman analysis.  The design features fiber-coupled, optically-pumped, passively Q-switched lasers that are small, portable, low cost and robust enough for even downhole applications.  The technology can be used in a wide array of applications, including, but not limited to, carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring for CO2 sequestration, oil and gas monitoring, and water analysis (groundwater and municipal systems).  The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with NETL.

Proof of concept experimentation has been completed. NETL researchers are continuing to design miniaturized lasers and optical delivery systems to allow further size and cost reductions. The researchers have identified the need to complete and demonstrate both single point and multipoint measurement prototypes.  The results would further validate the technology and expedite its deployment to the private sector. 

Allyl-Containing Ionic Liquid Solvents for Co2 Capture USPN 9,636,631

Research is active on the patent pending technology titled,“Sulfur Tolerant Ionic Liquid Solvent for Pre-combustion Carbon Capture.” This invention is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Application of Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Aqueous Systems U.S. Patent Pending

Research is active on the development and application of basic immobilized amine sorbents (BIAS) for use in the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) from aqueous systems. This invention is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Application of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Coatings for Improved Transpiration Cooling USPN 9,579,722

Research is active on the development and incorporation of oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) coatings for use in gas turbine component cooling applications. This invention is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Blended Polymer for Gas Separation Membranes U.S. Patent Pending

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed a new high performance microporous polymeric blend for carbon dioxide (CO2) gas capture and separation applications. This invention is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from NETL.

Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe USPN 7,839,282

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,839,282 titled "Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe."

Disclosed in this patent is an analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies in nonmetallic plastic pipe through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor to generate a capacitance versus location output for the detection and localization of anomalies within the nonmetallic material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle that can travel through the interior of a pipe. Supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas USPN 7,776,780

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 titled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl2, and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species, such as mercuric chloride (HgCl2), which is soluble in water and more easily removed from the stream.

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas USPN 9,820,526

Research is active on the patented technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Chemical Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use U.S. Patent Pending

Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Chemical Looping Air Separation Unit and Methods of Use" that combines the best attributes of chemical looping and oxy-fuel combustion technologies. Following patent approval, the technology will be available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.