Analysis of Gas Turbine Thermal Performance Email Page
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Performer: 
Ames National Laboratory
Schematic of the wedge-shaped duct with ribs and<br/>pin fins for the trailing edge of a turbine vane/blade.
Schematic of the wedge-shaped duct with ribs and
pin fins for the trailing edge of a turbine vane/blade.
Website:  Ames National Laboratory
Award Number:  FWP-AL05205018
Project Duration:  10/01/2004 – 09/30/2015
Total Award Value:  $995,000.00
DOE Share:  $995,000.00
Performer Share:  $0.00
Technology Area:  Advanced Energy Systems
Key Technology:  Hydrogen Turbines
Location:  Argonne, Illinois

Project Description

Ames Lab and Purdue University are developing cooling strategies through the following tasks: Develop and evaluate computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based analysis tools that can be used to study heat transfer issues in the design of turbine components and develop guidelines and best practices for their use; Examine the basis of the experimental methods used to validate CFD design and analysis tools; Apply CFD analysis tools to support the development of turbine technologies for advanced, near-zero emission-type coal-based power systems. The analysis tools of interest are those that can properly account for the steady and unsteady three-dimensional heat transfer from the hot gas in the turbine blade/vane passages through the turbine material system (thermal barrier coating and superalloy) to the internal cooling passages as a function of the cooling strategy as well as a function of the hot-gas and coolant compositions, mass flow rates, and temperatures.

Project Benefits

This project will develop computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based analysis tools for analyzing heat transfer issues in turbines. Turbine aerodynamics and heat transfer research will develop advanced cooling technology that will allow for higher firing temperatures which translate into increased cycle efficiency. Specifically, this project will develop, evaluate, and apply CFD-based analysis tools that can properly account for the steady and unsteady three-dimensional heat transfer from the hot gas in the turbine blade/vane passages through the turbine material system to the internal cooling passages as a function of the cooling strategy and the hot-gas and coolant compositions, mass flow rates, and temperatures.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Robin Ames: robin.ames@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Richard Dennis: richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Tom Shih: tomshih@purdue.edu

 

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