Nonlinear Acoustic Methods for the Detection and Monitoring of CO2/Brine Leakage Pathways in Wellbore Systems

 

Figure 1: Reciprocal time reversal (TR) in a solid.<br/>(a) A signal is emitted from the input source, scatters<br/>around the sample, and is recorded using a laser<br/>Doppler vibrometer that records out-of-plane<br/>displacement. The signal is then time-reversed, and<br/>as shown in (b), is emitted from the original source<br/>transducer. The signal then focuses at the laser<br/>detector. This process, known as reciprocal TR, offers<br/>tremendous power for imaging. In a borehole, the<br/>laser will be replaced by a downhole accelerometer.
Figure 1: Reciprocal time reversal (TR) in a solid.
(a) A signal is emitted from the input source, scatters
around the sample, and is recorded using a laser
Doppler vibrometer that records out-of-plane
displacement. The signal is then time-reversed, and
as shown in (b), is emitted from the original source
transducer. The signal then focuses at the laser
detector. This process, known as reciprocal TR, offers
tremendous power for imaging. In a borehole, the
laser will be replaced by a downhole accelerometer.
Performer: 
LANL - Los Alamos National Laboratory
Website:  Los Alamos National Laboratory
Award Number:  FWP-FE-634-15-FY15
Project Duration:  10/01/2015 – 09/30/2018
Total Award Value:  $1,253,866
DOE Share:  $986,866
Performer Share:  $267,000
Technology Area:  Geologic Storage
Key Technology: 
Location:  Los Alamos, New Mexico

Project Description

Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with partners Sandia National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, and Chevron Energy Technology, will work to improve capabilities to identify damaged wellbore materials and potential leakage pathways in existing wells through a proof-of-principle study for the development and field validation of an advanced diagnostic tool based on non-linear acoustic probes and time-reversal methodology. This will lead to improved prediction, identification, and quantification of wellbore leakage risk. The tool is based on focused acoustic energy and the unique time-reversal method to image and detect behind-casing damage in wellbore systems. The sensor technology will image the existence, 3D orientation, and extent of damage zones within wellbore materials and composites.

Project Benefits

The project will result in development of an acoustic probe tool, and data and analysis from laboratory measurements of wellbore materials in various experimental conditions and in-situ field validation tests. This will lead to a new method of monitoring and identifying potential well leakage and new understanding of the relation between stresses, well damage, and leak permeability. It will provide a means of locating remediation targets and assessing the success of remediation efforts. The effort will also support the Carbon Storage Program mission to develop and advance carbon capture and storage technologies for widespread commercial deployment in the 2025-2035 timeframe that will ensure safe, secure, efficient, and cost-effective CO2 containment in diverse geologic formations.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Mary Rice: mary.rice@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Pierre-Yves Le Bas: pylb@lanl.gov
 

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