Enhancement of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Cathode Electrochemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces

 

A comparative investigation on patterned LSC214/LSC113<br/>films (left panel) vs. LSC113/LSC214 films (right panel).<br/>The upper pictures are the SEM images and the lower plots are<br/>the Sr signals from Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical<br/>impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggest the<br/>LSC214/LSC113 films exhibit greatly enhanced ORR activity while LSC113/LSC214 films did not show clear activity enhancement.
A comparative investigation on patterned LSC214/LSC113
films (left panel) vs. LSC113/LSC214 films (right panel).
The upper pictures are the SEM images and the lower plots are
the Sr signals from Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical
impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggest the
LSC214/LSC113 films exhibit greatly enhanced ORR activity while LSC113/LSC214 films did not show clear activity enhancement.
Performer: 
University of Wisconsin System
Website:  University of Wisconsin System
Award Number:  FE0009435
Project Duration:  10/01/2012 – 09/30/2015
Total Award Value:  $625,162.00
DOE Share:  $499,926.00
Performer Share:  $125,236.00
Technology Area:  Solid Oxide Fuel Cells
Key Technology:  Anode-Electrolyte-Cathode Development
Location:  Madison, Wisconsin

Project Description

This University of Wisconsin project will focus on advancing the fundamental understanding of how solid oxide fuel cell cathodes operate such that their performance can be improved. This project will center around the role of material interfaces in determining electrochemical performance. Advanced physical characterization tools will be employed in support of a coordinated approach consisting of ab initio modeling and a unique electrochemical characterization technique called Non-Linear Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. The results will be interpreted to determine the operation mechanisms and identify new material architectures thereby enabling improved fuel cell performance.

Project Benefits

This project focuses on advancing the fundamental understanding of how cathodes operate, centering on the role of material interfaces in determining electrochemical performance. Improved cell/stack life and performance will reduce operating cost and increase efficiency, resulting in reduction in the cost of electricity and reduction of CO2 emissions from the entire platform. Specifically, this project will determine new operation mechanisms and material architectures using advanced physical and electrochemical characterization techniques and tools.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Briggs White: Briggs.White@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Shailesh Vora: Shailesh.Vora@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Dane Morgan: ddmorgan@wisc.edu
 

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