Optimal Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Response Surface Uncertainty Analysis

 

A large model with 3.25 million grid cells. Only the<br/>reservoir portion is shown. A region of the model is cut<br/>away to reveal its internal structure. Color represents<br/>the grayscale of the image obtained from the sediment<br/>experiment, with higher grayscale values indicating<br/>higher sand content and vice versa.
A large model with 3.25 million grid cells. Only the
reservoir portion is shown. A region of the model is cut
away to reveal its internal structure. Color represents
the grayscale of the image obtained from the sediment
experiment, with higher grayscale values indicating
higher sand content and vice versa.
Performer: 
University of Wyoming
Website:  University of Wyoming
Award Number:  FE0009238
Project Duration:  10/01/2012 – 09/30/2016
Total Award Value:  $475,389
DOE Share:  $380,047
Performer Share:  $95,342
Technology Area:  Geologic Storage
Key Technology:  GS: Geochemical Impacts
Location:  Laramie, Wyoming

Project Description

The project aims to investigate fundamental model complexity in representing coupled physical and chemical processes that accompany carbon storage operations in hierarchical subsurface geologic media. Specifically, the research is focused on developing a simulation and upscaling methodology that is generally applicable to sedimentary environments that are characterized with multiple scales of permeability, heterogeneity, and diverse mineralogies. This will include investigation of the effect of increasing reservoir permeability variance and depth on the uncertainty outcomes including optimal heterogeneity resolution(s) and investigation of the effect of mineral reactions occurring in the subsurface in geologic storage systems, including mineral volume fractions, reactive rate constants, reactive surface areas, and the impact of different geochemical databases.

Project Benefits

This project focuses on assessing how well upscaling and response surface methods represent coupled physical and chemical processes associated with CO2 storage. Response surface methods and appropriate upscaling have the potential to enable project developers to more confidently predict storage capacity and ensure storage efficiency and permanence by improving model granularity. Specifically, this project is using a multicomponent-multiphase-multiphysics non-isothermal reactive flow and transport model to assess upscaling and response surface methods applied to sedimentary environments. Additionally, the project facilitates the development and implementation of efficient workflows for modeling field-scale carbon storage in a variety of geochemically reactive environments, where formations exhibit multiple scales of permeability heterogeneity.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Mary Rice: mary.rice@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Ye Zhang: yzhang9@uwyo.edu
 

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