Project No: FE0007156
Performer: Ohio State University Research Foundation


Contacts

Duration
Award Date:  10/01/2011
Project Date:  09/30/2015

Cost
DOE Share: $497,223.00
Performer Share: $124,535.00
Total Award Value: $621,758.00

Performer website: Ohio State University Research Foundation - http://www.osu.edu

Advanced Energy Systems - Hydrogen Turbines

Effects of Hot Streak & Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition

Project Description

The particulate deposition model developed by The Ohio State University (OSU) in prior University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) work will be modified to better account for the fundamental physics of particle impact and sticking, including particle and surface properties. Experimental data from OSU's Turbine Reacting Flow Facility (TuRFR) deposition cascade facility will be used to validate the revised model.

The TuRFR facility will be modified to provide for the generation of inlet temperature profile non-uniformities (hot streaks), which will be tracked through the turbine nozzle passage using surface temperature infrared imagery and exit plane temperature measurements. Hot streak evolution and the effect of the hot streaks on deposition will be evaluated. Film cooling will then be added to both the experiments and the computation to evaluate its effect on hot streak migration and deposition. Finally, the model's ability to track hot streak migration will be exercised on a full turbine stage (vane and rotor) using data acquired in the OSU Gas Turbine Laboratory transient turbine test rig. The model will also be used to predict deposition in the rotating configuration, although there will be no experimental validation of deposition in the rotating frame.

OSU turbine reacting flow rig (TuRFR) showing upper and lower sections assembled.

OSU turbine reacting flow rig (TuRFR) showing upper and lower sections assembled.


Program Background and Project Benefits

Turbines convert heat energy to mechanical energy by expanding a hot, compressed working fluid through a series of airfoils. Combustion turbines compress air, mix and combust it with a fuel (natural gas, coal-derived synthesis gas [syngas], or hydrogen), and then expand the combustion gases through the airfoils. Expansion turbines expand a working fluid like steam or supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) that has been heated in a heat exchanger by an external heat source. These two types of turbines are used in conjunction to form a combined cycle— with heat from the combustion gases used as the heat source for the working fluid— improving efficiency and reducing emissions. If oxygen is used for combustion in place of air, then the combustion gases consist mostly of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water, and the CO2 can be easily separated and sent to storage or used for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Alternatively, the CO2/steam combustion gases can be expanded directly in an oxy-fuel turbine. Turbines are the backbone of power generation in the US, and the diverse power cycles containing turbines provide a variety of electricity generation options for fossil derived fuels. The efficiency of combustion turbines has steadily increased as advanced technologies have provided manufacturers with the ability to produce highly advanced turbines that operate at very high temperatures. The Advanced Turbines program is developing technologies in four key areas that will accelerate turbine performance, efficiency, and cost effectiveness beyond current state-of-the-art and provide tangible benefits to the public in the form of lower cost of electricity (COE), reduced emissions of criteria pollutants, and carbon capture options. The Key Technology areas for the Advanced Hydrogen Turbines Program are: (1) Hydrogen Turbines, (2) Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles, (3) Oxy-Fueled Turbines, and (4) Advanced Steam Turbines.

Hydrogen turbine technology research is being conducted with the goal of producing reliable, affordable, and environmentally friendly electric power in response to the Nation's increasing energy challenges. NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of technologies to achieve power production from high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from coal that is clean, efficient, and cost-effective; minimize carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions; and help maintain the Nation's leadership in the export of gas turbine equipment. These goals are being met by developing the most advanced technology in the areas of materials, cooling, heat transfer, manufacturing, aerodynamics, and machine design. Success in these areas will allow machines to be designed that have higher efficiencies and power output with lower emissions and lower cost.

The Ohio State University will modify the particulate deposition model developed in prior work to better account for the fundamental physics of particle impact and sticking, including particle and surface properties. The revised model will be validated using experimental data from OSU's Turbine Reacting Flow Facility (TuRFR) deposition cascade facility. Aerodynamics and heat transfer research conducted under the Advanced Turbine Program seeks to improve the understanding of heat transfer in turbine components, develop improved cooling methods and designs, and improve tools used to model heat transfer or particulate behavior under turbine operating conditions. These improvements will lead to improved component designs that will improve efficiency and reduce maintenance costs leading to reduced operating costs, lower costs of electricity, and reduced emissions.


Accomplishments