Tagging Carbon Dioxide to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

 

The diagram illustrates the conceptual model for the<br/>CO<sub>2</sub> tagging and storage demonstration site. “Dead”<br>CO<sub>2</sub> is tagged with atmospheric concentrations of CO<sub>2</sub><br/>before mixing with water and underground injection. The<br/>low pH dissolves basalt in the rock, which then precipitates<br/>out as carbonate. The CO<sub>2</sub> content of samples from the<br/>monitoring well is used to determine the extent of incorporation of CO<sub>2</sub> in the carbonate.
The diagram illustrates the conceptual model for the
CO2 tagging and storage demonstration site. “Dead”
CO2 is tagged with atmospheric concentrations of CO2
before mixing with water and underground injection. The
low pH dissolves basalt in the rock, which then precipitates
out as carbonate. The CO2 content of samples from the
monitoring well is used to determine the extent of incorporation of CO2 in the carbonate.
Performer: 
Trustees of Columbia University
Website:  Columbia University
Award Number:  FE0001535
Project Duration:  10/01/2009 – 06/30/2014
Total Award Value:  $2,299,348.00
DOE Share:  $1,711,680.00
Performer Share:  $587,668.00
Technology Area:  Monitoring, Verification, Accounting, and Assessment
Key Technology:  Near-Surface Monitoring
Location:  New York, New York

Project Description

This project developed two different injection systems for tagging CO2 with carbon 14 (14C) at atmospheric levels (1 part per trillion) and measuring the radioactivity in collected samples. Since 14C decays to the more common 12C isotope at a known rate, the level of radioactivity in the sample determines how much injected CO2 the sample contains. Such tagging of injected CO2 will lead to quantitative monitoring of injected CO2 and make it possible to accurately inventory geologically stored carbon. The systems were tested in the laboratory and at the CarbFix demonstration project in Iceland, where CO2 has been injected into a permeable basalt formation at 1,970 feet in depth. Once the technology is proven, adoption of this system will provide a quantitative methodology to verify the amount of CO2 stored, thereby increasing confidence in geologic storage.

Project Benefits

This project focused on developing a quantitative method to measure the amount of CO2 stored through geologic storage. More precise measurements allow project developers to confidently quantify the amount of CO2 permanently stored. Specifically, this project developed two systems to inject and tag CO2 with 14C and measured the radioactivity of collected samples to improve the overall monitoring resolution. Improved monitoring contributes to better storage techniques thus reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager 
Karen Kluger: Karen.kluger@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager 
Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator 
Klaus Lackner: kl2010@columbia.edu
 

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