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Welcome to the Energy Analysis Search Publications page. Hundreds of Energy Analysis related publications can be found in this repository. To get started, begin filtering the results below by using the quick filters located on the Search Publications Landing Page or search within filtered results by using the search box below. 


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Life Cycle Analysis: Petroleum

Approaches to Developing a Cradle-to-Grave Life Cycle Analysis of Conventional Petroleum Fuels Produced in the U.S. with an Outlook to 2040

Date: 10/7/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The U.S. crude consumption mix has changed dramatically since the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) first performed a comprehensive LCA of petroleum derived fuels (NETL, 2008). According to the Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, domestic production will account for nearly 60% of U.S. crude consumption by 2015 (EIA, 2015). This study examines the life cycle GHG footprint of diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel projected to 2040. The results of this analysis encompass a cradle-to-grave inventory of GHG emissions by utilizing open-source models (Oil Production Greenhouse gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE) and Petroleum Refinery Life Cycle Inventory Model (PRELIM)) paired with Monte Carlo simulation to account for changes to crude extraction, transport and refining as well as forecast uncertainty from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook (El-Houjeiri et al, 2013; Abella & Bergerson, 2012). Study results are documented in a forthcoming peer reviewed journal article.


NETL Fischer-Tropsch Black Box Model Documentation

Date: 9/15/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The purpose of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Black Box Model is to allow for the screening of the impacts of F-T finished fuels production based on the input of a unique syngas composition. Utilizing the composition of the raw syngas, the model calculates the following outputs based on a facility sized to produce 50,000 bbl/day of liquid product: CO2 emissions, liquid product flows, required syngas input, and the net export electricity from the facility.NETL completed this model/study for the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


NETL Fischer-Tropsch Black Box Model

Date: 9/15/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The purpose of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Black Box Model is to allow for the screening of the impacts of F-T finished fuels production based on the input of a unique syngas composition. Utilizing the composition of the raw syngas, the model calculates the following outputs based on a facility sized to produce 50,000 bbl/day of liquid product: CO2 emissions, liquid product flows, required syngas input, and the net export electricity from the facility. NETL completed this model/study for the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


Comprehensive Analysis of Coal and Biomass Conversion to Jet Fuel: Oxygen Blown, Transport Reactor Integrated Gasifier (TRIG) and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Catalyst Configurations Modeled and Validated Scenarios

Date: 9/8/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This study evaluates the technological/process, life cycle environmental, and economic perspective of 20 discreet F-T jet fuel production scenarios. The technological/process model provides a process level evaluation of the 10 alternate CBTL facility scenarios considered in this study. Aspen Plus simulation models for the CBTL facility scenarios were developed to determine the composition and flows of all of the major streams in the plants. These were used to develop conceptual level cost estimates for capital and operating costs for the major process units. NETL completed this study for the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


Comprehensive Analysis of Coal and Biomass Conversion to Jet Fuel: Oxygen Blown, Entrained-Flow Gasifier (EFG) and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Catalyst Configurations Modeled and Validated Scenarios

Date: 9/8/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This study evaluates the technological/process, life cycle environmental, and economic perspective of 10 discreet F-T jet fuel production scenarios. The technological/process model provides a process level evaluation of the 10 alternate CBTL facility scenarios considered in this study. Aspen Plus simulation models for the CBTL facility scenarios were developed to determine the composition and flows of all of the major streams in the plants. These were used to develop conceptual level cost estimates for capital and operating costs for the major process units. NETL completed this study for the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


Coal and Biomass to Liquids (CBTL) Greenhouse Gas Optimization Tool Documentation

Date: 3/11/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This report is the user documentation for the NETL CBTL Jet Fuel Model submitted under a separate approval routing. The documentation is intended to accompany the model. The documentation explains how to the use the model. The documentation does not contain any energy analysis findings. NETL completed this model/report as part of a study for the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


Coal and Biomass to Liquids (CBTL) Greenhouse Gas Optimization Tool

Date: 3/11/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

The purpose of the model is to perform scenario analysis to optimize GHG performance under varies CBTL configurations.  This model expands upon the NETL CBTL Jet Fuel Model by providing the user the ability to choose from three coal types (Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud sub-bituminous coal, or North Dakota Lignite) and three biomass types (Southern pine, switchgrass, or municipal solid waste). The model will also allow the user to adjust the fraction of the captured CO2 that is vented and adjust the overall efficiency of the plant.  The model includes environmental performance data for CBTL plants modeled under the CCAT case studies and two additional NETL studies: Production of Zero Sulfur Diesel Fuel from Domestic Coal: Configurational Options to Reduce Environmental Impact and Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 4: Coal-to-Liquids via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.


CBTL Jet Fuel Model

Date: 2/27/2015
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

An Excel-based model was developed to allow in-depth user access to the technological process, economic, and life cycle environmental results that were completed in support of this study, for each of the different CBTL jet fuel production scenarios (total of 49 unique result sets when counting both TRIG and EFG scenarios). The CBTL Jet Fuel Model incorporates a stochastic analysis of modeled results, drawing on input statistical distributions for the 17 environmental and 40 economic parameters. A stochastic analysis was performed by using the Palisade Corporation’s @RISK Excel add-in. NETL completed a CRADA with Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) to provide techno-economic and life cycle analysis modeling support for CBTL alternative jet fuel production, which forms key references to their report to the Defense Logistics Agency (their project sponsor/funder).


Developing an Approach for the Life Cycle Analysis of Conventional Petroleum Fuels: Outlook to 2040 – Crude Extraction and Transport

Date: 10/7/2014
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation, given at the LCA XIV Conference, starts with the original NETL baseline, which is consistent with other published values for conventional fuel production in the U.S, and updates it to determine the life cycle GHG footprint of diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel over time to 2040. The results of this analysis encompass a cradle-to-grave inventory of GHG emissions by utilizing updated models to account for changes to crude extraction, transport and refining.


A Review of the CO2 Pipeline Infrastructure in the U.S.

Date: 4/21/2014
Contact: Donald Remson

This report provides an overview of the state of CO2 pipeline infrastructure, both the existing and the current planned expansion based on industry announcements. In addition, EP-NEMS, a modified version of EIA's 2014 NEMS model, was used to run three cases in order to provide a snapshot of potential CO2 pipeline expansion under various carbon policy scenarios. The three scenarios studied were a reference case, an extended policies case (Cap40), and a carbon price case (CP25). The report also contains an overview of the current permitting, regulations, and policies involved with CO2 pipeline infrastructure.


Using Life Cycle Analysis to Inform Energy Policy

Date: 12/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

NETL uses LCA to understand the environmental burdens of energy systems and to inform policy makers. LCA is well suited for energy analysis, but its answers can change depending on what questions are being asked. NETL approaches all LCAs using a consistent method, which ensures comparability among LCAs. The granularity and flexibility of NETL's models makes it possible to identify key contributors to the environmental burdens of a system, as well as the ability to understand how results can change with changes to a given input parameter. In addition to understanding the attributes of a given energy technology, NETL can also perform consequential modeling that allows an understanding of how a given energy technology can affect the performance of other energy technologies. The effect of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) on conventional crude oil extraction is one example of such consequential analysis.


A Parameterized Life Cycle Analysis of Crude from CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery

Date: 10/2/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

Carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a tertiary oil extraction technology used after primary and secondary techniques have been used at an oil field. CO2-EOR operators use alternating injection schemes of CO2 and water to reduce the viscosity of crude oil, allowing recovery of a resource that would be otherwise unrecoverable. The primary objective of CO2-EOR is to produce additional crude oil from a mature oil field, but CO2-EOR also sequesters CO2. A process-based approach uses parameters that allow comparisons of different operating conditions and characterization of uncertainty. The model leverages existing NETL life cycle data to account for environmental burdens upstream and downstream from the CO2-EOR site, including natural dome and several anthropogenic sources of CO2, petroleum refining, and combustion of finished petroleum products such as gasoline or diesel.


The Carbon Footprint of Carbon Dioxide

Date: 10/1/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation examines the carbon footprint of obtaining carbon dioxide. While post-combustion capture at power plants may represent the best near-term opportunity for CO2 capture, there are other sources of CO2 in nature and industry. This analysis accounts for the environmental burdens of CO2 from three alternative sources: natural CO2 domes, natural gas processing plants, and ammonia production plants. This analysis uses a life cycle analysis (LCA) approach for developing data and modeling CO2 systems. The energy and material flows for key processes in the CO2 supply chain were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis.


Gate-to-Gate Life Cycle Inventory and Model of CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (Presentation)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

A gate-to-gate life cycle analysis (LCA) model was created to quantify the environmental impacts of the various processes associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The following unit processes are accounted for in this analysis: injection and recovery, bulk separation and storage, gas separation, supporting processes, and land use. This analysis used an LCA approach for developing data and EOR and gas processing. The energy and material flows for key processes within the gate-to-gate boundaries of the EOR site were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 barrel of crude produced via EOR).


Gate-to-Gate Life Cycle Inventory and Model of CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (Report)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

A gate-to-gate life cycle analysis (LCA) model was created to quantify the environmental impacts of the various processes associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The following unit processes are accounted for in this analysis: injection and recovery, bulk separation and storage, gas separation, supporting processes, and land use. This analysis used an LCA approach for developing data and EOR and gas processing. The energy and material flows for key processes within the gate-to-gate boundaries of the EOR site were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 barrel of crude produced via EOR).


Gate-to-Grave Life Cycle Analysis Model of Saline Aquifer Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide (Presentation)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

A gate-to-grave life cycle analysis (LCA) model was created to quantify the environmental impacts of the various processes associated with saline aquifer sequestration. The following unit processes are accounted for in this analysis: site preparation, well construction, carbon dioxide sequestration operations, site monitoring, brine management, well closure, and land use. This analysis used an LCA approach for developing data and modeling saline aquifer sequestration. The energy and material flows for key processes within the gate-to-grave boundaries of the saline aquifer were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 tonne of carbon dioxide sequestered).


Cradle-to-Gate Life Cycle Analysis Model for Alternative Sources of Carbon Dioxide (Presentation)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

While post-combustion capture at power plants may represent the best near-term opportunity for CO2 capture, there are other sources of CO2 in nature and industry. This analysis accounts for the environmental burdens of CO2 from three alternative sources: natural CO2 domes, natural gas processing plants, and ammonia production plants. This analysis uses a life cycle analysis (LCA) approach for developing data and modeling CO2 systems. The energy and material flows for key processes in the CO2 supply chain were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 kilogram of CO2 ready for compression and pipeline transport).


Cradle-to-Gate Life Cycle Analysis Model for Alternative Sources of Carbon Dioxide (Report)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

While post-combustion capture at power plants may represent the best near-term opportunity for CO2 capture, there are other sources of CO2 in nature and industry. This analysis accounts for the environmental burdens of CO2 from three alternative sources: natural CO2 domes, natural gas processing plants, and ammonia production plants. This analysis uses a life cycle analysis (LCA) approach for developing data and modeling CO2 systems. The energy and material flows for key processes in the CO2 supply chain were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 kilogram of CO2 ready for compression and pipeline transport).


Gate-to-Grave Life Cycle Analysis Model of Saline Aquifer Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide (Report)

Date: 9/30/2013
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

A gate-to-grave life cycle analysis (LCA) model was created to quantify the environmental impacts of the various processes associated with saline aquifer sequestration. The following unit processes are accounted for in this analysis: site preparation, well construction, carbon dioxide sequestration operations, site monitoring, brine management, well closure, and land use. This analysis used an LCA approach for developing data and modeling saline aquifer sequestration. The energy and material flows for key processes within the gate-to-grave boundaries of the saline aquifer were calculated. These processes were then compiled in a model that scaled the flows between processes to arrive at an inventory of environmental burdens on a common basis (e.g., 1 tonne of carbon dioxide sequestered).


The Challenge of Co-product Management for Large-scale Energy Systems—Power, Fuel and CO2

Date: 10/2/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

Applying traditional co-product management methods such as physical allocation and system expansion in conventional ways can lead to large study uncertainty in LCA of large scale energy systems. The use of advanced power plants with carbon capture as a source of CO2 results in the co-production of electricity and transportation fuels (gasoline or diesel). Co-product allocation can be avoided by expanding the system to include displacement of other routes to electricity generation, but conjecture about the expanded system leads to wide uncertainty. If energy is used as a basis for co-product allocation between electricity and liquid fuel (diesel or gasoline), the differences between the useful energy in the energy products hinders comparability. Partitioning a portion of the system, in this case the power plant, to perform more accurate energy allocation is a third approach, and is possible when detailed plant schematics allow disaggregation of integrated processes.


Exploring Economics and Environmental Performance: Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) - LCA XII Presentation

Date: 10/1/2012
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

This presentation poster discusses the Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT). The Power LCAT is a flexible model and associated tool which calculates electricity production costs and tracks life cycle environmental performance for a range of power generation technologies.


Calculating Uncertainty in Biomass Emissions Model, Version 2.0 (CUBE 2.0): Model and Documentation

Date: 11/15/2011
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

CUBE 2.0 was designed to facilitate examination of the sources and magnitude of uncertainties in GHG emissions resulting from cultivation, preparation, and delivery of biomass feedstocks and to allow exploration of the sensitivity of net emissions to these various uncertainties. Included are emissions associated with corn grain, corn stover, switchgrass, mixed prairie biomass, and hybrid poplar and two biomass residues: forest residue and mill residue. This model is an update to the CUBE 1.0 model released in March 2010.


A Comparative Assessment of CO2 Sequestration through Enhanced Oil Recovery and Saline Aquifer Seque

Date: 1/1/2011
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

A comparative assessment of CO2 sequestration through enhanced oil recovery and saline aquifer sequestration.


An Assessment of Gate-to-Gate Environmental Life Cycle Performance of Water-Alternating-Gas CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery in the Permian Basin

Date: 9/30/2010
Contact: Timothy J. Skone, P.E.

CO2-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) stimulates oil production while storing a portion of the injected CO2. Life cycle assessment was performed for three CO2-EOR scenarios to estimate the "gate-to-gate" greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with water-alternating-gas injection in a typical Permian Basin reservoir. Current CO2-EOR "best practices" generate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 71 kg CO2 equivalents (CO2E) per barrel of oil extracted - approximately three times greater than GHG emissions for the average barrel of domestic oil extracted in 2005.