Life Cycle Analysis


CCAT NETL CBTL Jet Fuel
The Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT) has received funding from the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Energy to demonstrate how liquid fuel can be produced from coal and meet the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 greenhouse gas (GHG) requirement for DOD fuel purchases of synthetic fuel. Section 526 of EISA requires that any fuel purchases have a life-cycle CO2 emission less than conventional petroleum fuel. This study evaluates different scenarios for the conversion of coal and biomass to jet fuel using oxygen blown, transport reactor integrated gasifier and Fischer-Tropsch catalyst configurations.
Authors: Tim Skone
Date: February, 2014

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Power Plant Flexible Model
The Power Plant Flexible Model (PPFM) is an Excel-based tool that simulates coal combustion-based power plant electrical output, emissions, materials usage, and costs for a fully-configurable mix of boiler and steam plant types, feedstocks, and emissions control equipment. The technical documentation and user's guide for the model are included in the download package. PPFM is not engineered to be a consumer-level product and requires knowledge of coal combustion power plants and processes to yield reasonable results.
Authors: Tim Skone, Greg Cooney, Matthew Jamieson
Date: November, 2013

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NETL Upstream Dashboard Tool
The goal of the Upstream Tool is to allow the user to customize key parameters specific to their Life Cycle case study or desired scenario, and generate customized Upstream Emissions results quickly and simply.
Authors: Tim Skone, Greg Cooney, Chungyan Shih
Date: June, 2012

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Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool
The Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) is a high-level dynamic model that calculates production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind (with and without backup power). All of the fossil fuel technologies also include the option of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. Power LCAT is targeted at helping policy makers, students, and interested stakeholders understand the economic and environmental tradeoffs associated with various electricity production options.
Authors: Justin Adder, Thomas E. Drennen, Joel Andruski
Date: May, 2012

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Calculating Uncertainty in Biomass Emissions
The Calculating Uncertainty in Biomass Emissions model, version 2.0 (CUBE 2.0) determines the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of biomass feedstocks from planting the biomass to delivery to the bioenergy plant gate. It includes emissions associated with feedstock production, transportation, and processing.  Model results and implications will be discussed in a forthcoming paper by these same authors and are therefore not presented in this document.
Authors: Tim Skone, Aimee E. Curtright, Henry H. Willis, David R. Johnson, David S. Ortiz, Nicholas Burger, Constantine Samaras, Aviva Litovitz, James McGee
Date: November, 2011

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Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Advanced Jet Propulsion Fuels: Fischer Tropsch Based SPK-1 Case Study
In response to the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA), NETL conducted a LCA (LCA) of 10 fuel production pathways using Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These pathways use varying combinations of coal and swithgrass feedstocks and two options for carbon managment (sequestration or enhanced oil recovery). Only greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are inventoried. Comparative analysis of the results demonstrate that higher percentages of biomass result in lower life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when using switchgrass. The choice of carbon management strategy has an effect on the results.
Authors: Tim Skone
Date: September, 2011

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Calculating Uncertainty in Biomass Emissions
The Calculating Uncertainty in Biomass Emissions model, version 1.0 (CUBE 1.0) determines the life cycle GHG emissions of biomass feedstocks from planting the biomass to delivery to the bioenergy plant gate ("farm-to-gate"). Included are emissions associated with feedstock production, transportation, and processing. The feedstocks in CUBE 1.0 include three dedicated energy crops (corn grain, switchgrass, and mixed prairie biomass) and two biomass residues (forest residue and mill residue). The report describes model layout and function. A free Analytica player for viewing and using this model can be downloaded from Lumina Decision Systems at: http://www.lumina.com/ana/player.htm.
Authors: Tim Skone, Aimee E. Curtright, Henry H. Willis, David R. Johnson, David S. Ortiz, Nicholas Burger,Constantine Samaras
Date: January, 2010

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NETL Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model
This is a life cycle greenhouse gas model of petroleum fuels. It is representative of U.S. refinery operations using a mix of domestic and imported crude oil. Refinery energy and emissions are allocated to individual refinery products using the volumetric throughput and hydrogen consumption of key unit operations within a petroleum refinery. Results are calculated in terms of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) per million Btu (MMBtu) of fuel consumed.
Authors: Chris Nichols
Date: November, 2009

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Development of Baseline Data and Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Petroleum-Based Fuels: Report and Model
This analysis shows results from NETL's life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) model of petroleum-based fuels. It is representative of U.S. refinery operations using a mix of domestic and imported crude oil. Results are expressed in terms of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) per million Btu (MMBtu) of fuel consumed. The total well-to-wheel GHG emissions from gasoline 96.3, 95.0, and 92.9 kg CO2e/MMBtu for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, respectively.
Authors: Chris Nichols, Tim Skone, Kristin Gerdes
Date: November, 2008

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