Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and Performance of Geologic Storage Coupled Modeling of Fault Poromechanics and High-Resolution Simulation of CO2 Migration and Trapping Email Page
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Performer: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
A preliminary high-resolution simulation of plume<br/>migration in a homogeneous, horizontal aquifer<br>under the effect of convective dissolution trapping.<br/>The simulation employs the fluid properties of the<br/>analogue fluid system (water and propylene-glycol)<br/>and a very low value of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 1; 000).
A preliminary high-resolution simulation of plume
migration in a homogeneous, horizontal aquifer
under the effect of convective dissolution trapping.
The simulation employs the fluid properties of the
analogue fluid system (water and propylene-glycol)
and a very low value of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 1; 000).
Website: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Award Number: FE0009738
Project Duration: 10/01/2012 – 09/30/2016
Total Award Value: $1,000,000
DOE Share: $800,000
Performer Share: $200,000
Technology Area: Geologic Storage
Key Technology: GS: Geomechanical Impacts
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts

Project Description

Researchers are developing a coupled flow and geomechanical model capable of simulating the poromechanics of faults to assess the potential for fault slip and fault activation upon CO2 injection. The specific objectives of this project are: (1) develop efficient mathematical and computational models of the coupling between CO2 injection and fault mechanical deformation; (2) develop high-resolution computational methods of CO2 migration during injection and post-injection for better predictions of capillary and solubility trapping; and (3) apply the models of fault poromechanics and CO2 migration and trapping to synthetic reservoirs.

Project Benefits

This project focuses on the development of tools for improving the modeling and risk assessment of CO2 permanence in geologic formations. This project is advancing the current baseline modeling and risk assessment technology by developing improved simulation approaches thereby contributing to better storage technology. This reduces emissions to the atmosphere. Specifically, these efforts improve modeling and risk assessment by applying the models of fault poromechanics and CO2 migration and trapping to synthetic reservoirs and actual deep formations in the continental United States.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Mary Sullivan: mary.sullivan@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Ruben Juanes: juanes@mit.edu

 

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