Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence, and Designing More Efficient Carbon Dioxide Storage Email Page
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Performer: University of Wyoming
Contour map of the porosity distribution of the<br/>Dinwoody Formation (left) and Red Peak Formation<br/>(right). These maps serve the basis for injection simulations.
Contour map of the porosity distribution of the
Dinwoody Formation (left) and Red Peak Formation
(right). These maps serve the basis for injection simulations.
Website: University of Wyoming
Award Number: FE0009202
Project Duration: 10/01/2012 – 09/30/2015
Total Award Value: $957,453
DOE Share: $751,461
Performer Share: $205,992
Technology Area: Geologic Storage
Key Technology: Fluid Flow, Pressure, and Water Management
Location: Laramie, Wyoming

Project Description

This project is focused on studying performance of CO2 storage at a Rock Springs Uplift (RSU) potential storage site in southwestern Wyoming using a multidisciplinary approach that integrates observational, experimental, and theoretical data with numerical simulations and determinations of seismic attributes. The objectives include: (1) Reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 storage capacity at the RSU; (2) Evaluate and ensure CO2 storage permanence at the RSU site by focusing on the sealing characteristics and 3-D interval heterogeneity of the confining layers; (3) Improve the efficiency of potential storage operations by designing an optimal coupled CO2 injection/brine production strategy that ensures effective pressure management; and (4) Improve the efficiency of brine production in the RSU relative to mineral scaling.

Project Benefits

This project focuses on advancing the characterization and assessment of the RSU in Wyoming as a carbon storage resource. This project is improving estimates of CO2 storage reservoir capacity, evaluating the long-term integrity and performance of confining layers, and managing injection to optimize CO2 storage efficiency, thereby contributing to better storage technology thus reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The effort focuses on the sealing characteristics and 3-D interval heterogeneity of the confining layers and improving the efficiency of potential storage operations.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Karen Kluger: karen.kluger@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Traci Rodosta: traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Fred McLaughlin: derf1@uwyo.edu

 

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