2010 Worldwide Gasification Database
  Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana
  Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana.

Summary

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database shows that current gasification capacity has grown to 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers. The database also shows that 11 plants, with 17 gasifiers, are presently under construction, and an additional 37 plants, with 76 gasifiers, are in the planning stages to become operational between 2011 and 2016. The majority of these plants – 40 of 48 – will use coal as the feedstock. The additional planned capacity from all new 2011-2016 plants is 51,288 MWth, an increase of more than 72%. If this growth is realized, worldwide capacity by 2016 will be 112,106 MWth of syngas capacity from 192 plants and 505 gasifiers.

Worldwide Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – Cumulative by Year

Worldwide Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – Cumulative by Year

A Dynamic Global Marketplace

Gasification is being increasingly viewed as a technology foundation – a means to convert coal and other carbon feedstocks into clean hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which are in turn used to create a variety of value-added products for the global economy. Its use in more than two dozen industrialized countries and the diversity of its products – electricity, chemicals, liquid transportation fuels, hydrogen, or substitute natural gas (SNG) – illustrate the enormous potential for the continued growth of the gasification industry. Environmental considerations, including measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, will increasingly drive energy pathway decisions, expanding the influence of gasification technologies because of its potential for significantly reducing emissions. Overall, the future growth of gasification technologies will be shaped by the balancing of capital and product cost in combination with environmental costs, regulatory requirements, and public acceptance.

Industry Changes

Current industry syngas output has increased by 26% since 2007—and by 50% since 2004. China has seven plants under construction (six to convert coal to chemicals and fertilizers, and one to convert coal to power). An additional 10 gasification plants are being planned for operation by 2016 in China (eight to convert coal to chemicals and fertilizers, and two to convert coal to power). Two integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are under construction in the United States, and growth is expected to continue with 16 projects planned for U.S. operation between 2010 and 2016 (combined, the 18 plants make up 47% of U.S. capacity growth for power generation, 23% for gaseous fuels, 18% for liquid fuels, and 12% for chemical facilities). Thirteen additional plants are planned worldwide—11 will use coal, and two will use biomass/waste.

Summary of the Gasification Industry
2010 Summary of the Gasification Industry

Regional Distribution

Gasification plants are now operating in 29 countries. The Asia/Australia region has 37% of the total operating capacity. The Africa/ Middle East region has strengthened its second position, due to the rapid growth in Qatar. Of the 10,857 MWth syngas capacity that is presently under construction, 65% is being built in the Asia/Australia region, 18% in Europe, and 17% in North America. With 63% of total planned capacity growth, North America has the potential to lead the world's regional growth through 2016. Another 34% will originate from the Asia/Australia region, with China leading this increase.

In the figures to follow, the operating capacity includes all gasification plants in either start-up, or commercial operation status, as of the end of 2010. Construction includes those projects that are under construction as of 2010. Planned capacity includes any commercial plant that is currently in a planning, design, or development stage, but has not yet begun construction and plans to start up by the end of 2016.

World Gasification Capacity (MWth) and Planned Growth – by Region
World Gasification Capacity (MWth) and Planned Growth – by Region

Feedstock Distribution

Coal retains its leading position as the predominant gasifier feedstock (51%). Petroleum provides 25% of feedstocks, with natural gas increasing to 22% due to the Pearl GTL in Qatar. All 11 plants currently under construction will be coal-fired. Of the 40,432 MWth syngas capacity that is in the planning stages for in the 2011-2016 period, more than 70% is expected to be coal fed, with petcoke to account for almost all of the remaining 30% capacity growth.

World Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – by Feedstock

Product Distribution

Marketable products generated from “syngas” include chemicals in the leading position (45%), followed by liquid transportation fuels (38%), power (11%), and gaseous fuels (6%). With 38% of planned capacity additions during the next six years, power will significantly improve its product position by 2016 and chemicals will be produced from 34% of capacity. Gaseous fuels and liquid fuels will be produced from the remaining 14% and 13% capacity additions. Seven of the plants under construction will produce chemicals and four will generate power.

World Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – by Product

World Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – by Product

Technology Distribution

Shell is the gasification technology provider that has the largest installed syngas capacity at 28,822 MWth, followed by Sasol Lurgi at 17,753 MWth, and GE at 16,334 MWth. Six of the plants currently under construction will use Shell technology. When planned capacity is added to current technology, GE switches places with Sasol Lurgi in terms of total capacity.

World Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – by Technology

World Gasification Capacity and Planned Growth – by Technology

 

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