Ultra-Supercritical Steam Cycle Turbine Materials Email Page
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Performer: ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Scanning electron micrographs of cast and heat-treated<br/>microstructures of (A) a reference heat of Inconel 740<br/>(formulation 2Nb-1.8Ti-0.9Al), and (B) new Inconel 740<br/>(formulation 1.5Nb-1.5Ti-1.3Al), modified for improved<br/>weldability. Note the continuous carbide boundary film<br/>of B, which may be the cause of low creep rupture ductility.
Scanning electron micrographs of cast and heat-treated
microstructures of (A) a reference heat of Inconel 740
(formulation 2Nb-1.8Ti-0.9Al), and (B) new Inconel 740
(formulation 1.5Nb-1.5Ti-1.3Al), modified for improved
weldability. Note the continuous carbide boundary film
of B, which may be the cause of low creep rupture ductility.
Website: ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Award Number: FWP-FEAA069
Project Duration: 10/01/2009 – 09/30/2016
Total Award Value: $2,550,000
DOE Share: $2,550,000
Performer Share: $0
Technology Area: Plant Optimization Technologies
Key Technology: High Performance Materials
Location: Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Project Description

This research will provide critical support for the materials technology needed to design steam turbines capable of reliable operation at temperatures and pressures typical of advanced ultrasupercrilica1 (AUSC) steam conditions, which range up to 760 degrees Celsius (1400 degrees Fahrenheit) and 345 bar (5000 pounds per square inch). This project at ORNL will be conducted in support of the DOE/EI0/EPRl USC Sleam Turbine Materials Consortium project, and will provide independent materials assessment, testing, and development input that complements the Consortium's activities. The tasks to be undertaken include: (I) Evaluation and development of high-temperature Ni-based alloy castings for AUSC steam turbine casing applications; (2) Evaluation of long-term materials performance including understanding of modes of degradation of cast and wrought Ni-based alloys under the conditions experienced by key components in A-USC steam conditions; (3) Understanding and quantification of corrosion in AUSC steam conditions, and (4) Acquisition of data needed by consortium project members for proof-of-concept steam turbine analysis and design, which will include micro-characterization, development of constitutive equations or predictive models, and upgrading of the damage evaluation and life-prediction criteria.

Project Benefits

This research will provide critical support for the materials technology needed to design steam turbines capable of reliable operation at temperatures and pressures typical of advanced ultrasupercritical steam conditions. Improvement to high-temperature advanced materials capable of extended operation at AUSC steam temperatures and pressures will promote the development of advanced power plant designs, leading to improved efficiency and operational flexibility, resulting in lower capital and operating costs.

Contact Information

Federal Project Manager Vito Cedro: vito.cedro@netl.doe.gov
Technology Manager Robert Romanosky: robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov
Principal Investigator Bruce Pint: pintba@ornl.gov

 

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