Global Collaborations

The Global Collaborations element includes ongoing partnerships with numerous international organizations to leverage U.S. expertise with other large-scale projects. The Carbon Storage Program relies on international collaborations to complement the program’s approach to reducing CO2 emissions. DOE is partnering with the International Energy Agency’s Greenhouse Gas R&D Program (IEAGHG), the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC), and is also engaged in a number of large-scale CCS demonstration projects around the world.

Working Relationships and Initiatives

Building these relationships and supporting these projects directly benefits U.S. efforts to develop technologies and tools to meet the strategic goals of the Carbon Storage Program. In addition, these collaborations provide a means to encourage exchanging lessons learned and knowledge sharing between industry and academia. This facilitates the adoption of appropriate technologies and trains personnel in the United States for future careers in the CCS industry throughout the world. An overview of each initiative is provided below:


Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF)

The CSLF, established in part by DOE, is a voluntary climate initiative that is currently comprised of 23 members that include 22 developed and developing countries and the European Commission. Members engage in cooperative technology development aimed to facilitate the advancement of cost-effective carbon storage technologies for the separation and capture of CO2, transportation of CO2, and long-term, safe storage of CO2. The purpose of the CSLF is to make these technologies available internationally and to identify and address wider issues relating to CCS, such as regulatory and policy options.


 

International Demonstrations

DOE is partnering with several international organizations operating throughout the world to advance research in carbon storage. Examples of DOE-supported international CCS projects include the Weyburn-Midale project in Canada, Sleipner project in the North Sea, and the Otway Basin project in Australia. The benefits of participating in these projects range from opportunities to field test innovative technologies at commercial and large-scale CCS operations around the world to representing U.S. expertise on multinational CCS investigative research and development teams.


North American Carbon Atlas Partnership (NACAP)

NACAP is one of the key efforts of the North American Energy Working Group and is a joint CO2 mapping initiative between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The purpose of NACAP is to create a North American carbon storage atlas that will speed the development of a comprehensive GIS database for CO2 stationary sources and geologic reservoirs and help build CCS related collaboration among the three countries.


World-Wide CCS Database

This database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCS projects worldwide. This database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCS technology. It lists technologies being developed for CO2 capture, testing sites for CO2 storage, project cost estimations (When known), and anticipated dates of project completion. The database uses Google Earth to illustrate the location of projects and provides a link to further project information. Project details are obtained from publically available information.


U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center

CERC facilitates joint research and development on clean energy technology through a collaboration of scientists and engineers from the United States and China. This initiative is funded equally by the United States and China and has broad participation from universities, research institutions, and industry. The advanced coal technology, including a CCS consortium, addresses technologies and practices for clean coal utilization and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. Read more about CERC.