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Release Date: July 1, 2011

NETL Hosts Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Series for the 2011 International Pittsburgh Coal Conference
What's Happening?

Top U.S. and international scientists, technology developers, and business leaders will gather in Pittsburgh this fall to discuss the role of science and business in bringing advanced clean coal technologies to market.

In a new series of sessions at the International Pittsburgh Coal Conference (PCC), NETL has assembled a diverse panel of experts in applied energy technology deployment, energy policy, investment and financing, and risk management and insurance.

The series, titled Major Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Projects, will address two sides of large-scale clean coal technology (CCT) projects. In six technical sessions, speakers will review the status of current U.S. and international demonstration projects. In three business sessions, presenters will talk about the financing of CCS and other CCT projects, as well as investment and risk management strategies.

Hear from Tom:
What is PCC, and what role is NETL playing in Major CCS Demonstrations Projects?
 
   

NETL’s Tom Sarkus, session co-chair, recently spoke about the importance of Major CCS Demonstration Projects and the value it brings to PCC participants. In the short video clips presented here, Tom talks about how the series will bring together the finance and scientific communities and what conference participants will gain by attending. In addition, he outlines how collaboration among researchers, project developers, and investors can help ensure the success of major energy technology demonstrations and the commercialization of energy advancements.

Who will speak?

Internationally recognized keynote speakers will discuss opportunities and challenges in today’s coal and power market—

 
Hear from Tom:
Can you tell us more about the speakers who will present?
   
  • Charles McConnell, Chief Operating Officer, DOE Office of Fossil Energy
  • Thomas Bonner, President, Cogentrix Energy
  • Steve Herman, Managing Director, Energy Capital Partners
  • Steve Orlins, President, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

Who will benefit?

Participants who will benefit from attending include—

  • Scientific and technical professionals interested in understanding how large-scale demonstration projects are funded
  • Hear from Tom:
    Who will benefit from attending?
     
       
     Technical professionals and developers interested in learning how the business community evaluates energy and power opportunities, as well as licensing and project funding opportunities
  • Executives and financial and investment professionals from the energy, power, mining, and chemical industries interested in clean coal technologies and potential areas for investment
  • Entrepreneurs within the coal and power sector seeking to learn about trends in policy, technology, investment, and risk management
  • International investors and researchers interested in U.S. clean coal technology advancements and project development opportunities
       
     
    Hear from Tom:
    Will the international community be represented in the sessions?

Why address business issues at an energy technology conference?

Major technology demonstration projects can, and often do, fail because developers lack adequate financial support. Attracting financing for large industrial and power projects that rely on innovative technologies such as carbon capture is always challenging—particularly in today’s tight credit markets.

Hear from Tom:
How is this session different from what PCC and NETL have offered before?
 
   

Projects are more likely to succeed when the business and research communities work together effectively. Major CCS Demonstration Projects will provide a platform for discussion about these issues.

Business sessions will address financial and investment strategies for the development of energy and power technologies, as well as risk management solutions for energy projects and coal-based power generation. Technical sessions will center on major demonstration programs being conducted by DOE and others related to coal-based power technologies, including CCS, low-grade coal utilization, advanced gasification and combustion systems, FutureGen 2.0, and syngas clean-up and utilization.

 
Hear from Tom:
What challenges will the sessions address?
   
Hear from Tom:
Can you tell us more about the demonstration projects that will be discussed?
 
   

For more information

The Twenty-Eighth Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference focuses on environmental emissions issues and technologies surrounding the continued use of coal and the development of future coal-based energy plants to achieve near-zero emissions of pollutants, reduced costs, and high thermal efficiency while producing a suite of products to meet future energy market requirements.

PCC is co-hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and NETL. The conference will be held September 12-15 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. The seven series presented at this year's conference include Combustion; Gasification; Sustainability and Environment; Carbon Management; Coal-Derived Products; Coal Science; and Major CCS Demonstration Projects. Activities will include a tour of a coal-fired power plant and a river cruise on Pittsburgh's Gateway Clipper.

For more information about Major CCS Demonstration Projects, contact co-chairs Tom Sarkus (thomas.sarkus@netl.doe.gov) and Gary Stiegel (gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov).  

For registration and other information about PCC, visit the conference website at www.engr.pitt.edu/pcc.



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  •  FE Office of Communications, 202-586-6503
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